New Zealand’s awesome landscapes, lush forests, amazing wildlife and pleasant climate make it a haven for many outdoor activities, and a great place to unwind. New Zealand society is diverse, sophisticated, and multicultural, and the honesty, friendliness, and openness of Kiwis will impress you. And the great advantage of New Zealand is that all of its diverse physical, cultural, and artistic landscapes are so close to each other!

The North Island of New Zealand has a 'spine' of mountain ranges running through the middle, with gentle rolling farmland on both sides. The central North Islands is dominated by the Volcanic Plateau, an active volcanic and thermal area. The massive Southern Alps from the backbone of the South Island. To the east of the Southern Alps is the rolling farmland of Otago and Southland, and the vast, flat Canterbury Plains. 

Click on the regions below to read more.


North Island - Northland

The Northland Region. Maori, Te Tai Tokerau (Te Hiku-o-te-Ika), "the Tail of the Fish" is the northernmost of New Zealand's regions. New Zealanders often call it the Far North, or, because of its mild climate, the Winterless North. The main population centre is the city of Whangarei and the largest town is Kerikeri. Read More...

North Island - Auckland

Don't think of Auckland as a city, even though it's New Zealand's largest. Think of it as half urban, half marine - a cosmopolitan experience wrapped up in a fascinating water world and surrounded by over 50 islands. Aucklanders enjoy a warm, humid climate and an outdoor lifestyle. Read More...

North Island - Waitomo

Waitomo is a Maori word made up of two parts. 'Wai' which translates as water and 'tomo' which means entrance or hole. Waitomo can be translated as the 'stream which flows into the hole in the ground'. This meaning is reflected through its fantastic geological history and landscape. Read More...

North Island - Coromandel

The Coromandel Peninsula has an extensive and spectacular coastline. On the west coast, there's a never-ending parade of beaches, coves and harbours lined with pohutukawa trees (a red-flowering native of New Zealand). The eastern side of the Coromandel is sprinkled with white sand and surf beaches. Read More...

North Island - Rotorua

From the moment people arrive in Rotorua they know they're somewhere quite different. There is a scent of sulphur in the air, and at nearby geothermal hotspots there are geysers spouting, acrid-smelling mud pools bubbling and belching and warm geothermal springs and ponds that create a kaleidoscope of color. Read More...

North Island - Lake Taupo

Lake Taupo was created from a major volcanic eruption. Hot springs appear in several places around the Lake, which is now an extinct volcanic crater. As well as this a number of hot pool complexes have been developed for visitors to take advantage of the natural hot water. Read More...

North Island - Tongariro

Tongariro is New Zealand's oldest national park and a World Heritage Area. This status recognises the area's important Maori cultural associations as well as its outstanding volcanic features. Set in the centre of the North Island. Red More...

North Island - Hawke's Bay

Basking in a Mediterranean climate, the Hawke's Bay region is known for its wine, food and fabulous scenery. Over 30 vineyards offer visitors a wine tasting and indoor/outdoor dining experience. Napier and Hastings the two main centres in the region have a high concentration of Art Deco and Spanish Mission architecture. Read More...

North Island - Wairarapa

Known for its hot summers, the region provides a relaxing break away from the hustle and bustle of the city. Activities in Wairarapa run the full spectrum, from adrenaline-pumping action to effortlessly raising a wine glass. Read More...

North Island - Wellington

Nestled between a sparkling harbour and rolling green hills, New Zealand's capital city is renowned for its arts, heritage, culture and native beauty and was recently named "the coolest little capital in the world" by Lonely Planet. Read More...

South Island - Nelson & Abel Tasman National Park

Nelson region is known for its year-round sunshine, golden beaches, three national parks, 300-plus working artists and craftspeople, boutique wineries, fresh local produce and seafood, historical streetscapes, waterfront cafes and restaurants, and a thoroughly relaxed lifestyle. The smallest of the New Zealand's national parks, Abel Tasman is a compact treasure house of nature with glittering beaches, turquoise water and spectacular ocean views. Read More...

South Island - Marlborough

The top of the South Island basks in a settled, year round climate and is blessed with a wide range of natural and cultural experiences. The Marlborough Sounds, a series of flooded river valleys now home to a wealth of bird and sea life, is one of the jewels in Marlborough's crown. Read more...

South Island - West Coast

The West Coast of the South Island is a sparsely populated region with some of the most dramatic scenery in New Zealand. It is an area of mountain peaks, impressive glaciers, tranquil lakes and raging rivers, lush rainforest and a magnificent coastline. Read More...

South Island - Christchurch and Canterbury

The region of Canterbury stretches from the majestic Southern Alps in the west to the waters of the Pacific Ocean in the east, from New Zealand's highest peak in the south to the deep ocean trench off the coast of Kaikoura in the north. Between these extremes lies a landscape of sheer mountainsides, green foothills, shingled riverbeds and rich agricultural plains. Christchurch is the South Island's largest city, a vibrant, cosmopolitan place heralded as the 'garden city'. Read More...

South Island - Mount Cook

Mackenzie Country is a high inland basin beneath the Southern Alps and Mt Cook, south-west of Christchurch. Mt Cook (Aoraki) towers above a splendid cast of massive snow-clad peaks that make up Mt Cook/Aoraki National Park. Read More...

South Island - Dunedin and Central Otago

Dunedin is framed by a magnificent harbour. It sits on the doorstep of Otago Peninsula, which has long been acclaimed for its beauty and wildlife. The Otago Peninsula boasts the world ¢â‚¬â„¢s only mainland breeding colony of the Albatross as well as fantastic viewing of the rare Yellow-Eyed Penguin and other ocean birds and mammals in their natural habitat. Read More...

South Island - Lake Wanaka

The crystal-clear waters of New Zealand's fourth largest lake reflect the snow-capped peaks of Mt Aspiring National Park, whose dominant feature is Mt Aspiring, towering above a magnificent glacier-sculpted wilderness. Read More...

South Island - Queenstown

Queenstown is an established international four-season resort with a diverse number of experiences on offer. There are over 200 attractions from bungy jumping to arts trails, a full range of accommodation from camp-sites to major hotels and luxury lodges, and a compact town center, Read More...

South Island - Fiordland

Fiordland is a World Heritage Area and the largest National Park in New Zealand and has natural wilderness on a grand scale, where waterfalls tumble hundreds of metres into pristine, forested valleys, and glacier-carved fiords indent its coastal boundaries. The Milford and Doubtful Sounds provide visitors with unequalled experiences of the natural beauty and wilderness of New Zealand. Read More...

South Island - Southland

Southland's lush, green pastoral lands are among the richest in the country. Throughout Southland are a number of accessible waterways that make the region a mecca for fishing enthusiasts. Read More...